Miriam Makeba on 78rpm

INTRO

Some years ago, in 2005, I found myself browsing through records at a thrift store in Richmond, Virginia and came across the LP, An Evening with Harry Belafonte and Miriam Makeba. It was two dollars!

The album dated from 1965, and I was immediately struck by the strong political message in the liner notes, critiquing the then white minority government of South Africa and its racial policies. I began to reflect upon how these mass-produced commodities (LP records), issued all over the world, were a perfect and significant vehicle for spreading an anti-apartheid message.

I set a goal of accumulating as many examples as I could of those messages and in the process discovered some amazing music. The research subsequently developed into an extensive art project documenting the work of Miriam Makeba.

Assembled over multiple years of sifting through internet auctions and receiving thousands of emails, I collected Makeba recordings and ephemera from all over the world. In an effort to map the journey of each record (and by implication Makeba’s voice), I catalogued where each was first recorded and where each was purchased. Numbering over 500 individually acquired items, the collection now includes thirty 78 rpm shellac discs, 266 vinyl LP records, 151 singles, a number of four-track reel-to-reel tapes, eight-track cartridges, cassette tapes, compact discs, DVDs, test records, an acetate demo recording, plus an original 16 mm print of Lionel Rogosin’s 1959 film, Come Back Africa.

I began exploring various visual strategies with this material and in 2009, I presented a number of artwork installations at the Bank Gallery in Durban, South Africa. I photographed every label in the collection, arranged them chronologically in a tight grid, and pinned the images to a black wall. The installation Labels became a visual document of Makeba’s life work but also formed an abstract color field that was for me reminiscent of a kind of craft work in South Africa.

Covers, the second work produced from this archive, assembled in a free-hanging clear plastic curtain, included the covers of one example of each of her recordings arranged chronologically, along with each iteration of that issue by country. The installation revealed Makeba’s changing portrait over time and the expanding global reach of her message. The clear curtain also made the rear liner notes accessible allowing the viewer to compare different pressings of identical albums and see how political content had been edited based on country of origin.

It was during this exhibition that Graeme Gilfillan of the ZM Makeba Trust and Siyandisa Music made contact with me. Graeme traveled to Durban to see the work and thus began a conversation around Miriam Makeba, her legacy and the roots of what would eventually become this compact disc.

In the years that followed, I found myself slowly expanding the limits of the collection to include any audio artifact from South Africa—jazz, punk, plays, political speeches, sports commentary, and so on. In 2010 I launched a non-profit, searchable online database as a visual archive for the broader South African collection at flatinternational.org. The following year I began blogging about this research at Electric Jive.


MIRIAM MAKEBA ON 78 RPM • 1955-1959
Compiled by Siemon Allen

After I assembled a compilation of less common material by Miriam Makeba, Tracks Less Travelled, for Electric Jive in October 2011, I promised to follow up with more, equally rare, sounds by the singer on 78 rpm. This second compilation, originally posted at Electric Jive in December 2012, features tracks that all come from the period before Makeba left South Africa in August 1959 and in many ways trace the growth of her early career—first as an individual (after many recordings with the Manhattan Brothers and others) and then with the all-female, close-harmony groups: the Sunbeams and the Skylarks. To my knowledge, none of the material here (save for one track) has been reissued in any subsequent format. Most of this material has not been heard in almost 60 years by anyone but the most ardent collectors.

I compiled the collection below in chronological order based on the matrix numbers of each recording and the results not only trace the evolution, but also paint a portrait of an artist (and indeed a culture) open to a broad range of stylistic influences—even before her departure from South Africa. Calypso, gospel, close-harmony American popular music of the 1940s and 50s and most significantly American jazz; all combined with local traditions to establish an eclectic palette. The source of the calypso is not hard to pin point. Makeba’s first two tracks in this style (recorded in 1957) are cover versions from Harry Belafonte’s classic and influential 1956 album Calypso (the first album to sell over one million copies in the United States). A fortuitous sampling—two years later it would be Belafonte himself launching Makeba’s global career. Indeed Makeba was an icon and pioneer who did not restrict herself to one culture but drew material from many languages and styles worldwide: Xhosa, Zulu, Swazi, English, French, Hebrew, Spanish, Portuguese, Guinean and so on. She truly was a global singer.

Miriam Makeba began her career singing with her second nephew, Zweli Kunene, and his group the Cuban Brothers possibly as early as 1952. It was with the Cubans that Makeba made her first recordings, at that time, for EMI. In her biography, My Story, Makeba recalls that it was while the Cubans were performing at the Donaldson Centre in Orlando East that she was spotted by Nathan Mdledle, lead vocalist of the Manhattan Brothers—South Africa’s most popular vocal group at that time. In 1953, at the age of 21, Makeba joined Mdledle, Joe Mogotsi, Ronnie Majola and Rufus Khoza—the Manhattan Brothers—as their single female singer replacing Emily Kwenane, who was looking to pursue a solo career. Mdledle opted for her English given name as a stage name rather than Zenzi Makeba and Miriam Makeba became a star. Mackay Davashe’s Laku Tshon iLanga was her first big hit with the Manhattans but not her first recording. (That may have been Nomasonto.) Gallo had sent the recording to a number of companies overseas and subsequently requested that the group re-record the song in English for an international market. With the help of American composer, Tom Glazer, Lovely Lies was the result pressed on the London label. Though Makeba later described how she felt that much of the core social drama of the original had been removed from the English version. The song became their first big international hit and also the first South African song to enter the Billboard Top 100 in the United States in February 1956.

Sometime in 1954 Makeba left the Manhattans to join Alf Herbert’s touring show African Jazz and Variety featuring Dorothy Masuka, Dolly Rathebe and Lionel Pillay amongst others and then was again reunited with the Manhattans on Ian Bernhardt’s variety show Township Jazz in 1955. She also recorded tracks under her own name for Gallotone in that same year.

Early in 1956 Sam Alcock at Gallo encouraged Makeba to form an all female vocal group to compete with similar acts at Troubadour and Trutone. She with her sister Mizpah and Johanna Radebe recorded two tracks as the Sunbeams on the Tropik label. The record sold well and the group was brought back into the studio but this time as the Skylarks on Gallo’s Gallotone label. The women continued to record under both names for both labels. For the second session Mizpah was replaced by Mary Rabotapi who was fourteen at the time. The trio then expanded to four with the recruitment of Mummy Girl Nketle. Helen van Rensburg succeeded Johanna Radebe and in late 1957 Van Rensburg was subsequently replaced by Abigail Kubeka who was sixteen at the time.

The group was now set for many of the classic recordings of the late 1950s. On occasion a fifth female voice in Nomonde Sihawu would join the quartet with Sam Ngakane on bass. The Skylarks were prolific and in three years became South Africa’s most popular vocal group recording over one hundred tracks and rivaling any of Gallo’s other major acts.

Between 1957 and 1958 planning and rehearsals began on what would become the biggest hit of 1959, South Africa’s first all-black African jazz opera: King Kong. The show was produced and directed by Leon Gluckman with music written by Todd Matshikza and included some of the key artists and musicians of the day. Makeba played the lead female role as Joyce, the girlfriend of the legendary and tragic boxer Ezekiel Dlamini, who was played by Nathan Mdledle. Other members of both the Manhattans Brothers and the Skylarks including Joe Mogotsi and Abigail Kubeka were also featured in the cast. The show opened to racially mixed audiences at the Wits Great Hall in February 1959 and then toured the country with much success for the next six months

Meanwhile, Lionel Rogosin, a young American filmmaker had spotted Makeba performing in African Jazz and Variety in 1958 and recruited her to sing in his clandestine film about township life in South Africa: Come Back Africa (named for the ANC’s freedom call Mayibuye iAfrica). The film was accepted into the 1959 Venice Film Festival and Rogosin invited Makeba to join him at the premier in Venice. Makeba applied for a passport to travel abroad and after many months of waiting, and what she later described as a harassing interview, she received one and subsequently left South Africa in August 1959. The film won the critics' award at Venice.

A few days prior to her departure around mid-August, Makeba joined the Skylarks in a final studio session at Gallo. One of the last songs recorded, aptly titled Miriam’s Goodbye to Africa, was only released after she had already left but became one of the Skylarks most successful tracks.

Makeba’s importance as an anti-apartheid figure is significant and well-documented. But I wonder if a new generation of South African listeners are aware of how singularly important she was to this movement and the global image of South Africa during these turbulent times? Before Mandela, Makeba was the face of South Africa to a global audience. 1960 is a watershed year in South African history. It is the year that Makeba released her first album in the United States, Europe and many other countries, but more importantly it is also the year of the Sharpeville massacre. The shootings were covered in the international press like no other prior event in South African history. The coverage sat on the front page of The New York Times for almost two months and during this time Makeba was performing in New York, on US national television, and was broadly covered and reviewed in the U.S. press. For many Americans she became the single face, literally, of a distant country in crisis.


FINAL THOUGHTS

In 2010 the Makeba! art project was presented for the first time in the United States in Imaging South Africa, an extensive exhibition of my work curated by Ashley Kistler at the Anderson Gallery in Richmond, Virginia. In 2011 the installation then travelled to the Krannert Art Museum in Champaign, Illinois for an exhibition curated by Tumelo Mosaka.

In July 2015 Derek Smith at Siyandisa Music contacted me about obtaining copies of the tracks featured in the blogposts at Electric Jive. Along with Graeme Gilfillan, we began the conversation of bringing these rare tracks into the ZM Makeba Trust fold and the possibility of turning the compilations into permanent CD reissues. I would like to thank Graeme Gilfillan, Derek Smith and all at Siyandisa Music for transforming an online investigation into hard-copy reality! Certainly I must also thank Chris Albertyn, Matt Temple and Nick Lotay, my colleagues at Electric Jive, for providing the platform and commitment to documenting South African music online. Moreover, none of this project would have been possible without the incredible assistance and support of my wife, Kendall Buster. Finally of course, I am indebted to Miriam Makeba for all the fantastic music! Who knew that a serendipitous find of a two dollar record in a junk store would mark the beginning of what would become an extensive archive of over 3000 items of South Africa audio history. Mayibuye!


Notes by Siemon Allen, March 2017


For more extensive liner notes about each track on this compilation visit the Electric Jive website and search for “Makeba on 78rpm”. For more information about the South African Audio Archive project visit flatinternational.org.

Business Affairs: Graeme Gilfillan. Special thanks to: Siemon Allen for his dedication and tireless research on the Miriam Makeba history. Also Thanks To: Dumisani Motha (Siyandisa Music), Charles Kühn, Paul de Klerk, Emil Stark, Rob O’ Brien, June Patal & Derek Smith (Next Music). Compilation by: Siemon Allen. Sleeve design by: Carla Vieira (idDigital Studios). Digitally remastered by: Deon Janse Van Vuuren (IU Studios)

Year:1955 - 1959
Country:South Africa
Format:CD (Original Release Vinyl)
Back to all Releases
Disk
Track
Recording
Duration
Song Details
Composer Miriam Mekeba Siyandisa Music (Pty) Ltd,
Author Miriam Makeba Siyandisa Music (Pty) Ltd,
Recording Details
Label Gallo Record Company
Performer Miriam Makeba
HistoryPass Office Special refers to the pass book that all black Africans had to carry during the height of the apartheid years. According to Rob Allingham solo recordings by Makeba were advertised by Gallo as early as October 1955. It is my measured guess that these two tracks are from that period. Each of these tunes, though, were hits for Troubadour’s Dorothy Masuka in 1956 and are featured on her compilation CD: Hamba Notsokolo. Pass Office Special was released by Masuka as the more up-beat Ngi Hamba Ngedwa. On the CD Masuka is credited as the composer for both tunes and Makeba gets the credit line on the Gallotone 78 rpms. While Makeba has notoriously claimed others songs as her own, I am almost confident that both these recordings predate Masuka’s versions. Though rivals, Masuka and Makeba were fast friends and often practiced songs together. Makeba gives this account of their relationship in her biography: "Dorothy and I are always singing: backstage at the shows, on the train, late at night at our hotel, everywhere! She is smart and fast. Dorothy also composes beautiful melodies. Always, she is thinking of a new one. When one pops into her head, she comes to me and says, "Hey Miriam! Take this part." I hum it, and she improvises by humming another part. It is too bad that we cannot record together, but we have contracts with different record companies. Still, we have fun together." (Makeba) Makeba would go on to “cover” a number of other Masuka songs during her career sometimes as her own compositions.
ABC 14045
Miriam Makeba
Gallotone Jive Jive, GB 2134
(1955)
Song Details
Composer Arranged by Miriam Makeba Siyandisa Music (Pty) Ltd,
Author Arranged by Miriam Makeba Siyandisa Music (Pty) Ltd,
Arranger Miriam Makeba Siyandisa Music (Pty) Ltd,
Recording Details
Label Gallo Record Company
Performer Miriam Makeba
HistoryABC 14046
Miriam Makeba
Gallotone Jive Jive, GB 2134
(1955)
Song Details
Composer Miriam Mekeba Siyandisa Music (Pty) Ltd,
Author Miriam Makeba Siyandisa Music (Pty) Ltd,
Recording Details
Label Gallo Record Company
Performer Miriam Makeba
Performer General Duze (guitar)
Performer The Skylarks
HistoryThis recording appear to be one of the very first issued by the Skylarks, who in this case were a vocal trio with Makeba, Joanna Radebe and Mary Rabotapi. General Duze is on guitar.

ABC 14406 - 1965
Gallotone Jive Jive, GB 2405
(1956)
Song Details
Composer Miriam Makeba Siyandisa Music (Pty) Ltd,
Author Miriam Makeba Siyandisa Music (Pty) Ltd,
Recording Details
Label Gallo Record Company
Performer Miriam Makeba
Performer General Duze (guitar)
Performer The Skylarks
HistoryThis recording appear to be one of the very first issued by the Skylarks, who in this case were a vocal trio with Makeba, Joanna Radebe and Mary Rabotapi. General Duze is on guitar.
ABC 14406
The Skylarks
Gallotone Jive Jive, GB 2405
(1956)
Song Details
Composer Miriam Mekeba Siyandisa Music (Pty) Ltd,
Author Miriam Makeba Siyandisa Music (Pty) Ltd,
Recording Details
Label Gallo Record Company
Performer Miriam Mekeba
Performer The Skylarks
HistoryABC 14407
The Skylarks
Gallotone Jive Jive, GB 2405
(1956)
Song Details
Composer Arranged by Miriam Makeba Siyandisa Music (Pty) Ltd,
Author Arranged by Miriam Makeba Siyandisa Music (Pty) Ltd,
Recording Details
Label Gallo Record Company
Performer Miriam Makeba
Performer The Skylarks
HistoryThis is the second disc released by the Skylarks. Musu Kuhamba is a much slower version of Dorothy Masuka’s hit Ufikizolo which is also featured on her CDHamba Notsokolo mentioned above. Allingham claims that Makeba was covering the Masuka song here even though the credit goes to Makeba on the disc label.
ABC 14664
The Skylarks with accompaniment
Gallotone Jive Jive, GB 2503
(1956
Song Details
Composer Miriam Makeba Siyandisa Music (Pty) Ltd,
Author Miriam Makeba Siyandisa Music (Pty) Ltd,
Recording Details
Label Siyandisa Music (Pty) Ltd,
Performer Miriam Makeba
Performer The Sunbeams
HistoryI had read that Makeba and the Skylarks had also recorded for GRC as the Sunbeams but until very recently was not able to locate a disc. I came across this find in a record store in Cape Town. It is not clear why the two names were used for the group's recordings with different companies but Makeba maintains that it was meant to give the appearance of a rivalry. (Makeba) Both GRC and Gallo shared recording studios and thus the matrixes are continuous. The arrangers however were different and according to Allingham gave the GRC material a rather "slap-dash quality".
Africa
ABC 15310
The Sunbeams
Tropik, DC 645
(1956)
Song Details
Composer Miriam Makeba Siyandisa Music (Pty) Ltd,
Author Miriam Makeba Siyandisa Music (Pty) Ltd,
History had read that Makeba and the Skylarks had also recorded for GRC as the Sunbeams but until very recently was not able to locate a disc. I came across this find in a record store in Cape Town. It is not clear why the two names were used for the group's recordings with different companies but Makeba maintains that it was meant to give the appearance of a rivalry. (Makeba) Both GRC and Gallo shared recording studios and thus the matrixes are continuous. The arrangers however were different and according to Allingham gave the GRC material a rather "slap-dash quality".
Recording Details
Label Siyandisa Music (Pty) Ltd,
Performer Miriam Mekeba
Performer The Sunbeams
HistoryI had read that Makeba and the Skylarks had also recorded for GRC as the Sunbeams but until very recently was not able to locate a disc. I came across this find in a record store in Cape Town. It is not clear why the two names were used for the group's recordings with different companies but Makeba maintains that it was meant to give the appearance of a rivalry. (Makeba) Both GRC and Gallo shared recording studios and thus the matrixes are continuous. The arrangers however were different and according to Allingham gave the GRC material a rather "slap-dash quality".
Uyangonwabisa
ABC 15311
The Sunbeams
Tropik, DC 645
(1956)
Song Details
Composer Arranged by Miriam Makeba Siyandisa Music (Pty) Ltd,
Author Arranged by Miriam Makeba Siyandisa Music (Pty) Ltd,
Arranger Miriam Makeba Siyandisa Music (Pty) Ltd,
Recording Details
Label Gallo Record Company
Performer Miriam Makeba
Performer The Skylarks
HistoryNdakugcinga comes from the same session and is the b-side of Kutheni Sithandwa. Both tunes are variations on Harry Belafonte’s Jamaica Farewell and his international hit the Banana Boat Song (respectively). The songs signal the beginning of the influence of Belafonte’s album Calypso which became a worldwide hit in 1956 and the first record to sell over a million copies. In Makeba’s version of Jamaica Farewell, Kingston Town is replaced by Sophiatown. According to Allingham the session included Miriam Makeba, Abigail Kubeka, Sam 'Vandi' Leballo, Mummy Girl Nketle, Mary Rabotapi (vocals), Almon Memela (guitar), Eddie Wyngaart (bass) and Dan Hill (bongos). The USA disc is a 1965 reissue of an earlier Gallotone release GB 2608. The influence of calypso in general would continue into a number of other tracks some of which are featured below.
ABC 15751
The Skylarks
USA, USA 301
(1957)
Song Details
Composer Miriam Makeba Siyandisa Music (Pty) Ltd,
Author Miriam Makeba Siyandisa Music (Pty) Ltd,
Recording Details
Label Gallo Record Company
Performer Miriam Makeba
Performer The Skylarks
HistoryABC 15845
Song Details
Composer Miriam Makeba Siyandisa Music (Pty) Ltd,
Author Miriam Makeba Siyandisa Music (Pty) Ltd,
Recording Details
Label Gallo Record Company
Performer Miriam Makeba
Performer The Skylarks
HistoryABC 15846
The Skylarks
Gallotone Jive Jive, GB 2689
(1957)
Song Details
Composer Lampert Southern Music
Composer Gluck Southern Music
Author Lampert Southern Music
Author Gluck Southern Music
Recording Details
Label Gallo Record Company
Performer Miriam Makeba
Performer The Skylarks
HistoryABC 15932

The Skylarks
Gallotone Jive, GB 2664
(1957)

Two tracks showing again the influence of calypso. Go Calypso opens with a conversation in which Makeba mentions in Afrikaans (or tsotsitaal) that the recording is taking place on June 26 which at that time happened to be the 5th anniversary of the start of the Defiance Campaign (in 1952) and the 2nd anniversary of the signing of the Freedom Charter (in 1955). June 26th 1957, the apparent day of the recording, was marked as Protest Day. "Later generations will remember June 26th, 1957 as the day on which the workers stayed at home in the year of the bus boycott, in the year of the treason trial, in the year when the people hit back. June 26 is the people's day, born of travail and tempered in the heat of struggle. On that day the people dedicate themselves anew to the struggle for freedom." (from Fighting Talk, July 1957). Today this day is celebrated as Freedom Day in South Africa.
Song Details
Composer Mary Rabotapi Gallo Music Publishers
Composer Miriam Mekeba Siyandisa Music (Pty) Ltd,
Composer Helen van Rensburg Gallo Music Publishers
Composer Mummy Girl Nketle Gallo Music Publishers
Author Mary Rabotapi Gallo Music Publishers
Author Miriam Makeba Siyandisa Music (Pty) Ltd,
Author Helen van Rensburg Gallo Music Publishers
Author Mummy Girl Nketle Gallo Music Publishers
Recording Details
Label Gallo Record Company
Performer Miriam Makeba
Performer The Skylarks
HistoryABC 15933
The Skylarks
Gallotone Jive, GB 2664
(1957)

Two tracks showing again the influence of calypso. Go Calypso opens with a conversation in which Makeba mentions in Afrikaans (or tsotsitaal) that the recording is taking place on June 26 which at that time happened to be the 5th anniversary of the start of the Defiance Campaign (in 1952) and the 2nd anniversary of the signing of the Freedom Charter (in 1955). June 26th 1957, the apparent day of the recording, was marked as Protest Day. "Later generations will remember June 26th, 1957 as the day on which the workers stayed at home in the year of the bus boycott, in the year of the treason trial, in the year when the people hit back. June 26 is the people's day, born of travail and tempered in the heat of struggle. On that day the people dedicate themselves anew to the struggle for freedom." (from Fighting Talk, July 1957). Today this day is celebrated as Freedom Day in South Africa.
Song Details
Composer Arranged by M. Davashe Gallo Music Publishers
Author Arranged by M. Davashe Gallo Music Publishers
Arranger Mackay Davashe Gallo Music Publishers
Recording Details
Label Gallo Record Company
Performer Miriam Makeba
Performer The Flashes
HistoryI am almost convinced that these two tunes by the Flashes feature Makeba on lead vocal, though I have no evidence other than her voice to go by. I included the first track on my earlier compilation mix here at Electric Jive: 78 Revolutions Per Minute: Majuba Jazz from Mra to Bra. Certainly the b-side track, Mme Matsoale, is one of the real gems of this compilation.
Siemon Allen

ABC 16062
The Flashes
Gallotone Jive, GB 2717
(1957)
Song Details
Composer Arranged by M. Davashe Gallo Music Publishers
Author Arranged by M. Davashe Gallo Music Publishers
Arranger Mackay Davashe Gallo Music Publishers
Recording Details
Label Gallo Record Company
Performer Miriam Makeba
Performer The Flashes
HistoryABC 16062 The Flashes, Gallotone Jive, GB 2717 1957
Song Details
Composer Arranged by Miriam Makeba Siyandisa Music (Pty) Ltd,
Author Arranged by Miriam Makeba Siyandisa Music (Pty) Ltd,
Arranger Miriam Mekeba Siyandisa Music (Pty) Ltd,
Recording Details
Label Gallo Record Company
Performer Miriam Makeba
Performer The Skylarks
HistoryABC 17033 The Skylarks, New Sound, GB 2847 - 1958
Song Details
Composer Miriam Makeba Siyandisa Music (Pty) Ltd,
Composer Mary Rabotapi Gallo Music Publishers
Composer Abigail Kubeka Gallo Music Publishers
Composer Mummy Girl Nketle Gallo Music Publishers
Author Miriam Makeba Siyandisa Music (Pty) Ltd,
Author Mary Rabotapi Gallo Music Publishers
Author Abigail Kubeka Gallo Music Publishers
Author Mummy Girl Nketle Gallo Music Publishers
Arranger Miriam Makeba Siyandisa Music (Pty) Ltd,
Recording Details
Label Gallo Record Company
Performer Miriam Makeba
Performer The Skylarks
HistoryABC 17243
The Skylarks
New Sound, GB 2861
(1958)
Song Details
Composer Gibson Kente Gallo Music Publishers
Author Gibson Kente Gallo Music Publishers
Recording Details
Label Gallo Record Company
Performer Miriam Makeba
Performer The Skylarks
HistoryABC 17799 The Skylarks with Miriam Makeba, New Sound, GB 3315 - 1959
Song Details
Composer Gibson Kente Gallo Music Publishers
Author Gibson Kente Gallo Music Publishers
Recording Details
Label Gallo Record Company
Performer Miriam Makeba
Performer The Skylarks
HistoryABC 17800 The Skylarks with Miriam Makeba, New Sound, GB 3315 - 1959
Song Details
Composer Gibson Kente Gallo Music Publishers
Author Gibson Kente Gallo Music Publishers
Recording Details
Label Gallo Record Company
Performer Miriam Makeba
Performer The Skylarks
HistoryABC 17811 The Skylarks with Miriam Makeba, New Sound, GB 2958 - 1959
Song Details
Composer Reggie Msomi Gallo Music Publishers
Composer Miriam Makeba Siyandisa Music (Pty) Ltd,
Author Reggie Msomi Gallo Music Publishers
Author Miriam Makeba Siyandisa Music (Pty) Ltd,
Recording Details
Label Gallo Record Company
Performer Miriam Makeba
Performer The Skylarks
HistoryABC 17812 The Skylarks with Miriam Makeba, New Sound, GB 2958 - 1959
I wanted to include Miriam's Goodbye to Africa in this compilation as it
significantly marks the end of her South African career. But this tune is also quite common so I have chosen to leave the transfer in its raw state without any software clean-up. The Breakfast Special, as I have called it, really does give one a sense of how some of these 78 rpms have aged. (Siemon Allen)

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